food

Legend

Legend is my new go-to Sichuan fix in New York City. It deserves this fair warning: the dishes are very spicy. For people like me, that is a plus. The appetizers here are on the smaller side, but their prices are competitively suited for the size. On the other hand, the entrees come in rather large portions. Therefore, for a table of two, an appetizer and entrée with rice OR two entrees should do the trick, give or take an appetizer or two. The flavors here are pretty authentic and provide no mercy with the amount of peppers and cilantro in the dishes. Strangely, some of the dishes mix in cheaper...

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Liberating Spices

"It’s true that hot foods can help your body burn more calories. When you eat foods with a kick, the spiciness elevates your body temperature and makes your heart beat faster, both which require energy. But the main reason that those who consume spicy foods are able to stay slimmer than others does not lie solely in the metabolism-boosting effects." When I was around nine years old, my grandfather told me that eating spicy foods would make me warmer in the cold weather. Since I was so skinny, I bravely examined and consumed a simple peppered piece of stir fry. I forced myself to eat what...

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New Shanghai Boston

New Shanghai Boston is fantastic for Sichuan/Szechuan food, rather than Shanghai-nese food. This is probably also one of the best Chinese food in the Chinatown area. New Shanghai is satisfying in its use of spicy chili oil iconic to the region. The beautiful red oil is a condiment made from the vegetable oil that has been infused with chili peppers. Therefore, it is meant to flavor and color, rather than to be eaten like a soup, as it sometimes may seem. The restaurant's levels of spicy-ness are already slightly reduced compared to other authentic Sichuan restaurants. Do try the typically famous...

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Ramen Setagaya

The fact that Ippudo is maybe just a block away just screams that you should head to Ramen Setagaya instead: the line here is rarely long, yet their ramen satisfies comfort food cravings. Ramen Setagaya has some cozy seating place decor and is famous for wavy ramen noodles and cha siu. I would also argue that they have a delicious selection of sides and sake bar appetizers. Try some tako/taco wasabi (raw baby octopus in wasabi sauce), buta-don (pork over rice perpetuated by tasty onions), and/or some onigiri (which is available for lunch in a set menu of $3.50 for two and a soda). Recently, they...

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Baluchi’s TriBeCa

Only come here for the 50% lunch special. Admittedly, the menu comprises of not necessarily the most authentic dishes because the fisherman’s boat curry with crab (one of my favorites) seems unlikely. However, the Northern style curries are very authentic in their flavor; they have a sort of spicy-ness that is definitely less than the average household curry but well-seasoned. The décor is amazing and the wait is not long. This is also another one of those places I like going to with a lot of people to do family-style and try as many curries as you can. Parties of one to fourteen are welcome!...

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Food of Fortune and Family Style Dining

Given that I am a Chinese American and lover of Chinese language and culture, readers may find that my blog is Asian food centric and find a lack of focus or expertise towards meat-fixated restaurants. After all, I grew up in a household in which the matriarch (or immigrant mother) barely has more than a drumstick per meal. Chinese people are traditionally Buddhists who eat very little meat. In China, food is considered a blessing. Particularly, many different foods are symbolic of celebration, peace, and other fortunes as explained on BBC. Even the table and method that one uses to eat are symbolic....

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Totto Ramen

Those who have been to Totto Ramen will agree with the following statement: the differentiated menu has not changed much since 2010 but really, this ramen is delicious. Ever-so-satisfying spicy and non-spicy options show the development of Japan's greatest comfort food. Even a meat lover should try the colorful and unique vegetable ramen. Throw in the Avo Tuna appetizer, consistently lightly torched, fresh tuna with garlic, creamy avocado and tangy citrus flavor. Japanese fusion flavor. Heavy eaters who need that little extra to be sated should settle for more ramen than any of the rice side dishes...

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Rub BBQ

The restaurant in Chelsea is now closed. The menu here is pretty clean cut. It's your average barbecue place with some extra perks and humor. Generally do not waste the beef brisket or the chili, which were not particularly interesting unless you had a personal preference. The pulled pork was of decent flavor, enjoyable and not too salty. Start out small because a meat platter was probably enough for my party of two. As for sides or appetizers, beware of the hard to digest. The fries were well seasoned, but avoid the potato salad and try the onion strings. The waitress did refill my lemonade,...

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Kum Gang San

Kum Gang San is actually my favorite Korean food restaurant. It is more than just its big parking lot and space-y restaurant space. Do not come here and order your average Korean barbecue, tofu, and seafood pancake. The chef is likely to be insulted if you ignore the new extensively long and extraordinarily detailed menu. First look to my other page for general tips for ordering family style. I have some personal preferences of course, such as the meat lovers' favorite, kalbi jim (short ribs). The grilled fish, such as jogi gui (yellow croaker) or jang uh gui (eel), will surprise even the most...

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